From @pathologistmag All In a Day’s Work: Administrative duties are closely linked with medical oversight. It’s to the peril of the institution when pathologists become advisors rather than participants in administration. For example, take the LIS. In cases where administrators have chosen systems without input from – or against the advice of – pathologists, those systems have sometimes needed to be abandoned or replaced at great cost to the institution. In cases where inadequate systems are implemented, essential activities like synoptic reporting and quality assurance, must often be carried out manually or by expensive add-ons. But the LIS isn’t the only potential pitfall; the same principle holds true for budgets, equipment purchase, and more.

Just how much should pathologists be working – and what happens if we exceed our limits?

Administrative duties are closely linked with medical oversight. It’s to the peril of the institution when pathologists become advisors rather than participants in administration. For example, take the LIS. In cases where administrators have chosen systems without input from – or against the advice of – pathologists, those systems have sometimes needed to be abandoned or replaced at great cost to the institution. In cases where inadequate systems are implemented, essential activities like synoptic reporting and quality assurance, must often be carried out manually or by expensive add-ons. But the LIS isn’t the only potential pitfall; the same principle holds true for budgets, equipment purchase, and more.

Source: All In a Day’s Work